Malaria is the most diffused human parasitic disease, with 300-500 million infected in the world and about 2 million deaths per year. This disease is endemic in tropical and subtropical areas of Africa, Asia, and Central and South America. The disease can be seen almost anywhere, however, as a result of international travel. Malaria is transmitted by mosquitos.

Cerebral malaria is a true medical emergency. In critically ill patients, treatment includes chloroquine, usually given by intramuscular injection, and quinine (or quinidine) given intravenously. In less severe cases, chloroquine alone can be used. If infection occurs in an endemic area of chloroquine-resistant falciparum malaria
(now most areas of the world except parts of Central America, Mexico, the Caribbean, and the Middle East), quinine plus pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine (Fansidar), doxycycline, or clindamycin should be used. In Southeast Asia, where multiple drug resistance occurs, various regimens include quinine plus tetracycline, artesunate (or artemether) plus mefloquine, and mefloquine plus doxycycline. Anticonvulsants should be given to control seizures. Transfusions of whole blood or plasma may be required. Other supportive measures include reduction of fever, fluid and glucose replacement, and respiratory support. Sedation may be necessary in excited or delirious patients. The use of dexamethasone is deleterious in the treatment of cerebral malaria. Mannitol should be used for life-threatening cerebral edema. An infrequent possibly corticosteroid-responsive postmalarial encephalopathy has been described.

Brain injury due to malaria+dengue in a 42y old man leading to permanent comatose state.