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The Calais “Jungle” is the nickname given to a refugee and migrant encampment in the vicinity of Calais, France, where migrants and refugees live. Many living in this camp attempt to illegally enter the UK via the Port of Calais or the Eurotunnel by stowing away on lorries, ferries, cars, or trains traveling to the UK. The camp gained global attention during the European refugee and migrant crisis when the population of the camp grew and French authorities carried out evictions.

Calais’ “jungle”, a sprawling camp now home to up to 10,000 migrants hoping to reach Britain, is to be totally torn down “by the end of the year”, the French government confirmed on Friday night.

However, truckers, local farmers and businesses said that despite the pledge they will go ahead with a planned operation to block the A16 motorway to and from the Channel port and Eurotunnel site on Monday.

“It would be better if they put off their trip as I can guarantee it will be a black day in terms of travel. The truckers will set of two convoys from Boulogne and Dunkirk and then block Calais. Everything will be stuck,” said a local police source.

 

Alors que les autorités françaises sont déterminées à démanteler la “Jungle” de Calais, la tension ne cesse de monter autour du camp. Démolir le camp, et ensuite? Le démantèlement n’est pas une solution, et les réfugiés “libérés” devront être abrités ailleurs, estime Julie Lavayssière de l’association Utopia56 dans un entretien à Sputnik.

PHILIPPE HUGUEN Calais: Cazeneuve marche sur des œufs Selon le ministre de l’Intérieur Bernard Cazeneuve, le gouvernement poursuivra, et avec la plus grande détermination, le démantèlement de la “Jungle” de Calais. Mais la démolition du camp est-elle vraiment une solution? Mme Lavayssière ne le pense pas. “Cela ne ferait qu’éclater la Jungle en des dizaines de petits camps autour. Le problème serait toujours le même, par contre le travail des associations, de la municipalité et de la police n’en serait que plus compliqué”. D’autant plus que ces gens ne vont pas partir et qu’ils demanderont l’asile, dit en écho Maya Konforti de l’association “l’Auberge des migrants”.

En savoir plus: https://fr.sputniknews.com/france/201609031027598328-jungle-calais-demolition-consequences/

We hereby to submit to all members the Email received the attention of the President of the Order of Physicians and Dentists of Perugia by the Dott. Antonio LOIACONO for a collaboration for the pharmaceutical supply in ETHIOPIA.

“Esteemed President,
I would need once again cooperation for one of the health projects of GSI Italy (www.gsiitalia.org), of which I am chairman and legal representative.
Remember, perhaps, that among the commitments undertaken by me in Ethiopia there is the pharmaceutical service four small clinics in the south of the country. The supply of drugs that generally we implement, by container, is for large quantities and individual specialties. In 2015 we sent in the southern hemisphere over 100 cubic meters of drugs. Ethiopia we need a richer variety of specialties and small quantities. The work that we have done with the help of the Order in 2015, was effective and excellent yield.
At the beginning of April I part the doctor in charge of the structures (Dr. Stefano Greys Order of Bologna) since the end of 2015 medical director of the Ethiopian-supported structures GSI Italy.
In anticipation of I would be able to ensure by 2016 the contribution of Perugia doctors with donations of medicinal samples, as well as possibly of consumer healthcare products and small efficient bathroom equipment, which is available to give we cater to the centers in Ethiopia and other southern countries.
I ask my colleagues to select packages that have expiration of less than five months. Just call the number 0743 49987, a.m. office hours or signal the availability at antonioloiacono@gsiitalia.org to concert the withdrawal of materials. If interested in the issue of a certificate of donation, GSI Italy, NGO suitability Mae, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, will issue an appropriate certification also for tax purposes. In this case it is required to colleagues compiling must supply a note of the drugs and delivered equipment.
Dear President, thank you very much again for your cooperation.
Best regards,
Antonio Loiacono, doctor, Spoleto

 

 

Con la presente siamo ad inoltrare a tutti gli iscritti l’Email pervenuta all’attenzione del Presidente dell’Ordine dei Medici Chirurghi e degli Odontoiatri di Perugia da parte del Dott. Antonio LOIACONO per una collaborazione per il rifornimento farmaceutico in ETIOPA.

 

Pregiatissimo Presidente,

avrei bisogno ancora una volta della sua collaborazione per uno dei progetti sanitari di GSI Italia (www.gsiitalia.org), di cui sono presidente e legale rappresentante.

Ricorderà, forse, che tra gli impegni da me assunti in Etiopia c’è il rifornimento farmaceutico di quattro piccole cliniche nel sud del Paese. Il rifornimento di farmaci che generalmente attuiamo, a mezzo container, è per grandi quantitativi e per singole specialità. Nel 2015 abbiamo inviato nel sud del mondo oltre 100 metri cubi di farmaci. Per l’Etiopia avremmo bisogno di una più ricca varietà di specialità e di piccoli quantitativi. Il lavoro che, con l’aiuto dell’Ordine abbiamo fatto nel 2015, è stato efficace e di ottima resa.

Ai primi del mese di aprile mi rientra il medico responsabile delle strutture (dr Stefano Cenerini dell’Ordine di Bologna) dalla fine del 2015 direttore sanitario delle strutture etiopi supportate da GSI Italia.

In previsione dell’incontro vorrei essere in grado di assicurare anche per il 2016 il contributo dei medici perugini con le donazioni dei campioni delle specialità, così come eventualmente, di prodotti sanitari di consumo e di piccola attrezzatura sanitaria efficiente, che si è disponibili a cedere ai Centri da noi assistiti in Etiopia e in altri Paesi del sud.

Chiedo ai colleghi di selezionare confezioni che abbiano scadenze non inferiori ai 5 mesi. Basta telefonare al numero 0743 49987, orario ufficio a.m. o segnalare la disponibilità all’indirizzoantonioloiacono@gsiitalia.org per concertare il ritiro dei materiali. Ove interessati al rilascio di una certificazione della donazione, GSI Italia, Ong con idoneità Mae, Ministero Affari Esteri, rilascerà una certificazione idonea anche ai fini fiscali. In questo caso si richiede ai colleghi la compilazione di una notula dei farmaci e dell’attrezzatura consegnata.

Caro presidente, la ringrazio vivamente ancora per la collaborazione.

Cordiali saluti,

Antonio Loiacono, medico, Spoleto.

Dear Friends and Family,lesvos.jpg

It has been just over a week since my return from Lesvos and I am still trying to process all that I learned and witnessed during my short stay helping out as a volunteer nurse.  The situation has not changed with the changing temperatures and political climate.  Refugees in the thousands are still making that perilous trip across choppy waters from Turkey to Greece in the hope of making a new life in Europe.  The political situation has changed somewhat. The EU is no long registering N. Africans, Iranians and Asians as they once were, creating a backlog of innocent and frustrated migrants on the island and elsewhere in Greece.  Today, only Syrians, Iraqis and Afghans are allowed to pass through Greece and on towards other European countries.  Whereas these are bona fide refugees, many have come without documents to prove their countries of origin, and although they may be Hazara from Afghanistan their language is Farsi, so they can easily be labeled as Iranians and not allowed to continue their voyage.  There are very few translators in the camps who can help the local police with the registration process, so people are mislabeled, told they must be held until they can be deported and given only the necessities that volunteers can provide while they wait.

I had the privilege of working with the ragtag group of volunteers who came to help out on “Afghan hill” or Moria camp, where everyone but Syrians were directed to wait, sometimes for as much as 5 days, until they could be properly processed.  The clinic where we were working was well-run and professional. We saw hundreds of refugees a day, some still soaked through from their trips on the rubber boats, many with severe anxiety reactions, sore throats, viruses or just in need of a little bit of concerned care.  We had some translators, but they were few and often we relied on hand gestures to ascertain what the medical problem was. Often we could find a refugee who spoke that language as well as English. The refugees were all very happy to help us out.  I saw too many grown men weep when they tried to explain their trip while pulling out photos of loved ones lost.  I have no idea if those loved ones died during the trip or in their place of origin, but the memories of the sad parents or spouses of all those happy faces in the photos will haunt me forever.  There were children too traumatized to speak or to take a piece of candy that was offered. There were elderly people as well.  Many had come with their families, some alone as couples.  Once they were changed into dry clothing and given food, we were left trying to find a shelter for them and other vulnerable groups for the night.  The shelters (small camping tents)were few, so many were left to wait out the night next to a burning pile of plastic or the few branches that they could find.  Whereas the official “Syrian camp” was adjacent to ours (a walled compound manned by police), we did not mix.  If there was a more critical medical case, we brought those patients in wheelchairs (not an easy feat up the rutted grassless terrain) to be seen by Medecins san Frontiers or Medecins du Monde, which provided care in that gated and barb wired camp.  UNHCR was a presence there in the Syrian camp as well. I can’t say more than that.  There were two representatives in their tent and they were not seen at the shorelines where people were disembarking or swimming to the shore.  They did provide the many buses, which brought the newcomers to the camps each day.

I want to thank you all for your donations, kind thoughts and prayers, but most of all, I want to thank you for not forgetting about this tragedy that is unfolding.  These people need our help, not our derision. They are mostly innocent victims of bad political decisions. They represent all of us in some way or another.

I hope that this holiday season brings joy and peace to all of you and that the New Year can be one of hope for a better future for everyone.  Thank you again for your support.

Love and Peace, Anne

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a day in the med by Michele Berloco

regione per regione

A third of migrants received in Italy, excluding minors, is distributed in two regions: Sicily and Lazio, which host respectively 22% and 12% of the 73,883 total. The Veneto, however, is among the major regions of the North hosting fewer people, with 4%, while those with less migrants is the Valle d’Aosta, which is home to only 62, 0%.

The percentage is calculated based on the relationship between immigrants and population. The data is updated to May 6 and is contained in a table of the Interior Ministry where there is a breakdown by region of migrants in Cara centers for asylum seekers, in Sprar, the reception system for refugees, and temporary structures .

IMG_2779

Hundreds of migrants have drowned in the Mediterranean this month, amid a surge in overcrowded boats heading for Europe from Libya.

The flow of desperate migrants from North Africa hoping to reach Europe is already much higher than in the same period last year.

Italy is on the frontline and has urged its EU partners to do more to help.

At an emergency summit on 23 April EU leaders pledged to beef up the bloc’s maritime patrols in the Mediterranean, disrupt people trafficking networks and capture and destroy boats before migrants board them.

However, any military action would have to conform with international law. The chaos in war-torn Libya remains a huge problem.

Championing the rights of poor migrants is difficult as the economic climate is still gloomy, many Europeans are unemployed and wary of foreign workers, and EU countries are divided over how to share the refugee burden.

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