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Patologi Oltre Frontiera (Pathologists Beyond Borders) is a non-governmental association founded in Venice in 1999 with the aim of realizing projects for developing pathological anatomy and oncologic diagnostics in the South of the world.

Born for an initiative of a group of Anatomic pathologists, members of the Committee of the International activities of SIAPEC (Società Italiana di Anatomia Patologica e Citologica Diagnostica – the Italian Society of Anatomic Pathology and Diagnostic Cytopathology), began in the same year its activity, taking part in a project aimed at creating a Patologic anatomy Service in Tanzania, proposed by the “Associazione Cultura e solidarietà Vittorio Tisòn”.

In 2001 Patologi Oltre Frontiera was officially acknowledged as ONLUS, while in 2006, following the acknowledgement of the Ministry of foreign affairs, was included in the list of qualified non governmental organizations.

For a decade, Patologi Oltre Frontiera has been realizing projects in Africa, Latin America, Europe and Middle East.

Furthermore, in these years, it has been underwriting partnership agreements with different institutional and association realities, both National and Territorial, Italian and Foreign realities.

eurodisney 037Rome, June 27 (Reuters) – Eight out of ten foreign prisoners do not know, basically, their rights to health in prison. But the Italians have some difficulty, considering that the entire prison population has information on the reform of prison health only in 60% of cases. While less than a third of the operators of the prison knows the content of the news on the subject of health care in prison. Are some findings, presented this morning in Rome, the project ‘Health without barriers’, made by the National Institute for Health and Migration Poverty and the Ministry of Health on a proposal from the Ministry of Interior. Own initiative created to promote awareness among foreign prisoners of the right to protection of health and the knowledge of the functioning of health services in prison.

The project – started May 30, 2012 and closing June 29 – involved 12 Italian prisons in North, Central and South and also involved health professionals and social health, the prison officers and the leadership with different types of intervention: from information seminars for courses distance learning to a search. “The project – told Adnkronos Salute Gianfranco Costanzo NIHMP, project coordinator – has allowed us to check the status of implementation of health care reform the prisons and give information to the prisoners, training of health workers and involve the directors of prisons and the commanders of the prison. E ‘was also possible to carry out a research on the perception of the reform on the part of the various components of prison life. ”

The results showed “a low perception of their rights on the part of foreign prisoners,” says Costanzo. “I emerged the need to better coordinate the health care world that is in charge of the health of prisoners (and which today is in ASL, in the implementation of the reform which transferred responsibility from the Dap NHS) with the needs that are specific to the system detention, and therefore the security of society and people. serves to match together with the safety requirement of the protection of health, a goal to which we are not yet arrived. “

Neurology cooperation in Africa, the EFNS perspective

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In 2050 nearly 1.5 billions people aged over 60 will live in less developed countries. According to UN data and WHO facts sheet 2010 Niger will have the fewest people over 60 (5%).

In the picture the dark areas represent regions in 2050 where the percentage of 60+residents rises over 25% of total population.

Longer life fewer babies will push on a demographic shift, by 2050 one in 5 people will be aged 60+ they will outnumber people under 14y

 

Last september the 10th at Stockholmassen took place the EFNS annual meeting. I had the chance to follow this great session chaired by JOHANN SELLNER, MUNICH, GERMANY
ISRAEL STEINER, PETACH-TIKVA, ISRAEL.

Travel related CNS infections
Erich Schmutzhard, INNSBRUCK, AUSTRIA

Diseases such as Malaria and many Parassitosis are getting more and more frequent in western populations. Tailored campaigns may help migrants and travellers to better prevent serious consequences (see post on malaria). Even a a couple of weeks visit to relatives in endemic malaric areas without appropriate prophilaxis may expose a family to infections. Once back in europe in case of troubles doctors should think to uncommon diseases more frequently (? to let them know is our duty).

Neurological complications of vaccination
Israel Steiner, PETACH TIKVA, ISRAEL

Perivaccinic neurological complication in a wide definition may be more frequent then expected even if hard to diagnose. GB syndrome also may be a potential consequence.

Emerging CNS infections of worldwide importance
Johann Sellner, MUNICH, GERMANY

After the large diffusion of transpalnations al over the world in acute post transplantation and later phases minor infectious agent may play a crucial role. (rabia, HSV)

Perugia and Montessori : The “Centro Internazionale Montessori ” of Perugia is a wonderful piece that integrated the activities of academic institutions (universities Italian and foreign) providing that special something to the city educational system. Google yesterday delighted us with a doodle dedicated to the great pedagogue, lucky that someone remembers.

Vienna University recently adopted the smart city index.

A city can be defined as ‘smart’ when investments in human and social capital and traditional (transport) and modern (ICT) communication infrastructure fuel and sustainable development and a high quality of life, with a wise management of natural resources, through participatory governance.

Perugia entered at the 54th european ranking (as first Italian city) in one of the 6 sub indicators: citizenship. This was not expected see Wired June 2012 #40 pag 79

According to the criteria adopted by Ciriaci and colleagues in the survey published on proceedings of the International Conference on “Human Capital and Employment in the European and Mediterranean Area” Bologna, 10-11 March 2011 the souhern Italy graduates migration choices are directly connected with the following variables: i) unemployement rate of the residency area, ii) unemployment rate of the chosen education area, iv) scientific prestige of the centre. The migration trend considered from south to north considered as target migration areas the Italian central-northern regions: Lazio, Tuscany, Umbria, Marche, Emilia-Romagna, Liguria, Valle d‟Aosta, Piedmont, Lombardy, Trentino A.A., Friuli Venezia-Giulia, Veneto. The southern regions are Campania, Abruzzi, Molise, Puglia, Basilicata, Calabria, Sicily and Sardinia, which comprise the so-called „Mezzogiorno‟.

An outpatients service for immigrants in Perugia reccommended by ​Catholic doctors (amci) and Caritas. To pursue the matter at the conference in honor of Vittorio Trancanelli, 23 June, came to Perugia, Riccardo Poli, medical director at Prato, founder of the medical center for immigrants in Florence known as “the clinic of the Stenone”, the whose clinic several years ago was named after the doctor Vittorio Trancanelli Perugia, a sign of understanding and closeness between Florence and Perugia mentioned by Professor Fausto Santeusanio. “I could not come, Poli said, remembering his long friendship with the Archbishop. Gualtiero Bassetti when he was still in Florence, and that this clinic for immigrants know the story well. Even for this Mgr. Bassetti convincingly supports the initiative which it wishes to be a work “sign” in addition to those already implemented by Caritas. The intervention by Riccardo Poli was like a journey through the past twenty years. A relatively short time in which there have been radical changes in the legislation on immigrants. Poli recalled the beginning of the surgery of Stenone, when Msgr. Bassetti was vicar general of the diocese of Florence. It was the early 90’s, there was the Martelli Law and no medical care was granted to immigrants. Many doctors began to provision by a voluntary service and a lay association was founded, although very close to Christianity, to accommodate medical or non-believers of other faiths. The wives of doctors’ office, the drugs were applied to the pharmaceutical and private laboratories every week for years have given free samples for analysis. The experience of Florence was born after that of Rome had been active since 1981. In 1997 things changed, reminded Poli, with health care reform desired by the Minister Bindi, who wanted the same Poli consultant to the Ministry. We had to change mentalities Poli said recalling for example the work of mediation with the Ministry of the Interior that raises the problem of “traceability” of foreigners without papers. It was not easy, but in law went through the line of those who supported the obligation “not to report” illegal immigrants to the police except in cases provided for the Italians themselves. So, after the State ensured health care for immigrants, the doctors decided to focus on the Stenone dentistry, general medicine and pediatric surgery, or offering a specialist service on the one hand and the other a general assumption for those who may not have the “family doctor”. Contrary to what is feared, said Poli, immigrants do not suffer and do not carry exotic diseases, but more often they get sick of smoking, and stress that is leading to reactive depression, creating the phenomenon of “migrant exhausted.” “I think today to make medicine for the immigrant is easier,” concluded Poli, because, he added, “makes no sense to think of a specialist, but should focus on general pediatric medicine and dentistry because illegal immigrants can not get the medical family or in programs of prevention “. The key, he added, is to have a relationship with the local health authorities, a Memorandum of Understanding that allows to have the recipe and the cup.

Daniela Monni, director of Caritas dicoesana, recalled that in Perugia had been opened many years ago, a clinic for immigrants who then was closed and not reopened because there was no need. “Remember Trancanelli Vittorio – he added – means remembering a way of being, a way” to doctors “who provide the other with their lives.” What and how to act today, on the face of health care to immigrants, are the themes on which the AMCI and Caritas are now considering.

air pollution from mumbai to nairobi, a study confirms that air pollution peaks may contribute to increase the risk of hospitalization for stroke and particulate matter seems to be a significant risk factor, especially for lacunar stroke

strokefocus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seems more and more evident that  levels of air pollution considered safe by health care authorities such as WHO can contribute to higher rates of cognitive decline, stroke, and heart attack, according to many paper recently published.

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