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Miscommunication in the healthcare sector can be life-threatening. The rising number of migrant patients and foreign-trained staff means that communication errors between a healthcare practitioner and patient when one or both are speaking a second language are increasingly likely. However, there is limited research that addresses this issue systematically. This protocol outlines a hospital-based study examining interactions between healthcare practitioners and their patients who either share or do not share a first language. Of particular interest are the nature and efficacy of communication in language-discordant conversations, and the degree to which risk is communicated. Our aim is to understand language barriers and miscommunication that may occur in healthcare settings between patients and healthcare practitioners, especially where at least one of the speakers is using a second (weaker) language.

from Australia http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4566365/

IMG_0122[1]

In 2050 nearly 1.5 billions people aged over 60 will live in less developed countries. According to UN data and WHO facts sheet 2010 Niger will have the fewest people over 60 (5%).

In the picture the dark areas represent regions in 2050 where the percentage of 60+residents rises over 25% of total population.

Longer life fewer babies will push on a demographic shift, by 2050 one in 5 people will be aged 60+ they will outnumber people under 14y

 

Last september the 10th at Stockholmassen took place the EFNS annual meeting. I had the chance to follow this great session chaired by JOHANN SELLNER, MUNICH, GERMANY
ISRAEL STEINER, PETACH-TIKVA, ISRAEL.

Travel related CNS infections
Erich Schmutzhard, INNSBRUCK, AUSTRIA

Diseases such as Malaria and many Parassitosis are getting more and more frequent in western populations. Tailored campaigns may help migrants and travellers to better prevent serious consequences (see post on malaria). Even a a couple of weeks visit to relatives in endemic malaric areas without appropriate prophilaxis may expose a family to infections. Once back in europe in case of troubles doctors should think to uncommon diseases more frequently (? to let them know is our duty).

Neurological complications of vaccination
Israel Steiner, PETACH TIKVA, ISRAEL

Perivaccinic neurological complication in a wide definition may be more frequent then expected even if hard to diagnose. GB syndrome also may be a potential consequence.

Emerging CNS infections of worldwide importance
Johann Sellner, MUNICH, GERMANY

After the large diffusion of transpalnations al over the world in acute post transplantation and later phases minor infectious agent may play a crucial role. (rabia, HSV)

…Affluent Arabs used to head to hospitals in the US when they needed treatment. But now, post-Iraq, they are increasingly choosing Germany’s private clinics. With the average foreign patient spending an estimated €80,000 a stay, competition to attract the medical tourists is fierce…. by Monocle 2008…

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