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We hereby to submit to all members the Email received the attention of the President of the Order of Physicians and Dentists of Perugia by the Dott. Antonio LOIACONO for a collaboration for the pharmaceutical supply in ETHIOPIA.

“Esteemed President,
I would need once again cooperation for one of the health projects of GSI Italy (www.gsiitalia.org), of which I am chairman and legal representative.
Remember, perhaps, that among the commitments undertaken by me in Ethiopia there is the pharmaceutical service four small clinics in the south of the country. The supply of drugs that generally we implement, by container, is for large quantities and individual specialties. In 2015 we sent in the southern hemisphere over 100 cubic meters of drugs. Ethiopia we need a richer variety of specialties and small quantities. The work that we have done with the help of the Order in 2015, was effective and excellent yield.
At the beginning of April I part the doctor in charge of the structures (Dr. Stefano Greys Order of Bologna) since the end of 2015 medical director of the Ethiopian-supported structures GSI Italy.
In anticipation of I would be able to ensure by 2016 the contribution of Perugia doctors with donations of medicinal samples, as well as possibly of consumer healthcare products and small efficient bathroom equipment, which is available to give we cater to the centers in Ethiopia and other southern countries.
I ask my colleagues to select packages that have expiration of less than five months. Just call the number 0743 49987, a.m. office hours or signal the availability at antonioloiacono@gsiitalia.org to concert the withdrawal of materials. If interested in the issue of a certificate of donation, GSI Italy, NGO suitability Mae, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, will issue an appropriate certification also for tax purposes. In this case it is required to colleagues compiling must supply a note of the drugs and delivered equipment.
Dear President, thank you very much again for your cooperation.
Best regards,
Antonio Loiacono, doctor, Spoleto

 

 

Con la presente siamo ad inoltrare a tutti gli iscritti l’Email pervenuta all’attenzione del Presidente dell’Ordine dei Medici Chirurghi e degli Odontoiatri di Perugia da parte del Dott. Antonio LOIACONO per una collaborazione per il rifornimento farmaceutico in ETIOPA.

 

Pregiatissimo Presidente,

avrei bisogno ancora una volta della sua collaborazione per uno dei progetti sanitari di GSI Italia (www.gsiitalia.org), di cui sono presidente e legale rappresentante.

Ricorderà, forse, che tra gli impegni da me assunti in Etiopia c’è il rifornimento farmaceutico di quattro piccole cliniche nel sud del Paese. Il rifornimento di farmaci che generalmente attuiamo, a mezzo container, è per grandi quantitativi e per singole specialità. Nel 2015 abbiamo inviato nel sud del mondo oltre 100 metri cubi di farmaci. Per l’Etiopia avremmo bisogno di una più ricca varietà di specialità e di piccoli quantitativi. Il lavoro che, con l’aiuto dell’Ordine abbiamo fatto nel 2015, è stato efficace e di ottima resa.

Ai primi del mese di aprile mi rientra il medico responsabile delle strutture (dr Stefano Cenerini dell’Ordine di Bologna) dalla fine del 2015 direttore sanitario delle strutture etiopi supportate da GSI Italia.

In previsione dell’incontro vorrei essere in grado di assicurare anche per il 2016 il contributo dei medici perugini con le donazioni dei campioni delle specialità, così come eventualmente, di prodotti sanitari di consumo e di piccola attrezzatura sanitaria efficiente, che si è disponibili a cedere ai Centri da noi assistiti in Etiopia e in altri Paesi del sud.

Chiedo ai colleghi di selezionare confezioni che abbiano scadenze non inferiori ai 5 mesi. Basta telefonare al numero 0743 49987, orario ufficio a.m. o segnalare la disponibilità all’indirizzoantonioloiacono@gsiitalia.org per concertare il ritiro dei materiali. Ove interessati al rilascio di una certificazione della donazione, GSI Italia, Ong con idoneità Mae, Ministero Affari Esteri, rilascerà una certificazione idonea anche ai fini fiscali. In questo caso si richiede ai colleghi la compilazione di una notula dei farmaci e dell’attrezzatura consegnata.

Caro presidente, la ringrazio vivamente ancora per la collaborazione.

Cordiali saluti,

Antonio Loiacono, medico, Spoleto.

Miscommunication in the healthcare sector can be life-threatening. The rising number of migrant patients and foreign-trained staff means that communication errors between a healthcare practitioner and patient when one or both are speaking a second language are increasingly likely. However, there is limited research that addresses this issue systematically. This protocol outlines a hospital-based study examining interactions between healthcare practitioners and their patients who either share or do not share a first language. Of particular interest are the nature and efficacy of communication in language-discordant conversations, and the degree to which risk is communicated. Our aim is to understand language barriers and miscommunication that may occur in healthcare settings between patients and healthcare practitioners, especially where at least one of the speakers is using a second (weaker) language.

from Australia http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4566365/

Dear Friends and Family,lesvos.jpg

It has been just over a week since my return from Lesvos and I am still trying to process all that I learned and witnessed during my short stay helping out as a volunteer nurse.  The situation has not changed with the changing temperatures and political climate.  Refugees in the thousands are still making that perilous trip across choppy waters from Turkey to Greece in the hope of making a new life in Europe.  The political situation has changed somewhat. The EU is no long registering N. Africans, Iranians and Asians as they once were, creating a backlog of innocent and frustrated migrants on the island and elsewhere in Greece.  Today, only Syrians, Iraqis and Afghans are allowed to pass through Greece and on towards other European countries.  Whereas these are bona fide refugees, many have come without documents to prove their countries of origin, and although they may be Hazara from Afghanistan their language is Farsi, so they can easily be labeled as Iranians and not allowed to continue their voyage.  There are very few translators in the camps who can help the local police with the registration process, so people are mislabeled, told they must be held until they can be deported and given only the necessities that volunteers can provide while they wait.

I had the privilege of working with the ragtag group of volunteers who came to help out on “Afghan hill” or Moria camp, where everyone but Syrians were directed to wait, sometimes for as much as 5 days, until they could be properly processed.  The clinic where we were working was well-run and professional. We saw hundreds of refugees a day, some still soaked through from their trips on the rubber boats, many with severe anxiety reactions, sore throats, viruses or just in need of a little bit of concerned care.  We had some translators, but they were few and often we relied on hand gestures to ascertain what the medical problem was. Often we could find a refugee who spoke that language as well as English. The refugees were all very happy to help us out.  I saw too many grown men weep when they tried to explain their trip while pulling out photos of loved ones lost.  I have no idea if those loved ones died during the trip or in their place of origin, but the memories of the sad parents or spouses of all those happy faces in the photos will haunt me forever.  There were children too traumatized to speak or to take a piece of candy that was offered. There were elderly people as well.  Many had come with their families, some alone as couples.  Once they were changed into dry clothing and given food, we were left trying to find a shelter for them and other vulnerable groups for the night.  The shelters (small camping tents)were few, so many were left to wait out the night next to a burning pile of plastic or the few branches that they could find.  Whereas the official “Syrian camp” was adjacent to ours (a walled compound manned by police), we did not mix.  If there was a more critical medical case, we brought those patients in wheelchairs (not an easy feat up the rutted grassless terrain) to be seen by Medecins san Frontiers or Medecins du Monde, which provided care in that gated and barb wired camp.  UNHCR was a presence there in the Syrian camp as well. I can’t say more than that.  There were two representatives in their tent and they were not seen at the shorelines where people were disembarking or swimming to the shore.  They did provide the many buses, which brought the newcomers to the camps each day.

I want to thank you all for your donations, kind thoughts and prayers, but most of all, I want to thank you for not forgetting about this tragedy that is unfolding.  These people need our help, not our derision. They are mostly innocent victims of bad political decisions. They represent all of us in some way or another.

I hope that this holiday season brings joy and peace to all of you and that the New Year can be one of hope for a better future for everyone.  Thank you again for your support.

Love and Peace, Anne

EU and migration

In this three-part special edition of Perspectives we look at Europe’s recurring summer migrant tragedy; the other side of the immigration debate that causes such division in Europe.

Soon the number of migrants italy has plucked from the cruel seas this year will go past 100,000. The annual trickle has become a flood of boats with Libya descending into chaos. This is where 90 percent of this summer’s north African exodus comes from.

Image

A survey from Max Planck Odense Center on the Biodemography of Aging and Institute of Public Health –Department ofEpidemiology, Biostatistics and Biodemography, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Compositional changes due to internal migration can modify the distribution of health outcomes, death rates, and socio-economic characteristics of a specific geographical area. Migration flows may affect patterns of socio-economic inequalities in mortality as well. However, despite these inequalities being an important social and geopolitical feature of an area, there is still little empirical evidence on this effect. This paper contributes to deepening the knowledge about this phenomenon by investigating whether post-war internal migration in Italy affected the pattern of mortality inequality by socio-economic status, from age 50 years onwards, in Turin, one of the main industrial areas of the country, to which many low-educated individuals from the southern regions migrated, seeking jobs in the car factories. Migrants might be selected in terms of robustness because of the healthy migrant effect. However, low-educated individuals are employed in heavier and riskier jobs. They thus undergo a faster health selection due to exposure to a higher mortality risk that selects the most robust individuals. This paper hypothesised that the interplay of these mechanisms might have produced a homogenisation process towards robustness of the population by reducing the unobserved heterogeneity in survival chances and that these processes affected men more than women, because women were likely to be more passive actors in the migratory decisions and less heavily involved in the industrialisation process. The results show that women have higher levels of heterogeneity in susceptibility to death and wider differentials mortality by education level than men, which both support the hypotheses. © 2014 The Authors. Population, Space and Place. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

 

Grazie a tutti gli amici intervenuti alla serata

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The low incidence of some infectious diseases reflects effective public health prevention measures, such as vaccinations. For a select group of zoonotic infectious diseases with high death rates, the low incidence reflects infrequent spillover from an animal reservoir into humans. Often, humans represent a dead-end host for these pathogens, and person-to-person transmission is rare if appropriate infection control practices are followed.

see the cdc paper at http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/20/2/13-1748_article.htm

Additional 2,808 foreign doctors will arrive in Brazil this week, President Rousseff announced. The doctors will join the other health professionals who began entering the country in July in order to take part in the government’s Programa Mais Médicos (“Mnatale2013 059ore Doctors Program”).

Under an agreement that will earn cash-strapped Cuba some $225 million a year, Cuban doctors have been deployed to health centers in the slums of Brazilian cities and villages across the drought-stricken Northeast that had no resident doctors. Bahia state is reopening rural health centers that were unstaffed.

Developing Medicine issue 2013

tentative table of Contents 2013 issue

The Italian Hospital in London
S.Tiberi -UK

Kampo; Japanese Traditional Herbal Medicine – Historical
background and Current Status
K. Fujiwara, N. Takahashi, K. Saito, Japan

Neurosurgery goes green? Herbal medicine in the treatment
of chronic subdural haematomas
N. Murgia – Italy

Mental Health initiative of cooperation between Umbria and Uva Province, Sri-Lanka
Antonia Tamantini, Anna Toni, Teresa La Ferla, Maurizio Bechi Gabrielli, Italy

Public access defibrillation program an inititative in Rosario
Héctor A. Bonaccorsi, Ana Isabel Fumagalli Argentina

Hospital service of cultural mediation and interpretation in Foligno by Casa dei Popoli, Italy

premiazioneAquathlon in Perugia

Thanks for the invitation to friends Trasimeno Triathlon. Here are the awards for young athletes who competed in the first Aquathlon organized into the pool Parco Lacugnanp of Perugia

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